composite and pressure treated decking opinions

However, thanks to an explosion of composite lumber, plastic decking and hardwood imports, there's now a dizzying array of decking available. Whether you're ... In fact, according to Arch Treatment Technologies, a leading producer of wood preservatives, approximately 75 percent of all new decks are finished with pressure-treated (PT) lumber. ... In most regions of the country, redwood and cedar each cost at least three times more than pressure-treated lumber.

That investment can vary widely, from around $15 per square foot installed for pressure-treated Southern yellow pine decks to more than $30 per square foot for cedar and redwood. Building it yourself? ... Other choices include exotic hardwoods and a variety of nonwood products, such as engineered vinyl systems and plastic-wood composites. and there are the different shapes, ... In addition, PT preservative chemical residue may cause health problems. If you're doing the building, ...

There are benefits and drawbacks to both pressure-treated wood and composite decking for your Charlotte deck. One is less expensive. The other requires nearl...

Cedar is the most popular natural wood option, thanks to its rich finish and grain and full-bodied color. In addition to its aesthetic value, cedar is also a light wood, meaning that your deck builder or craftsman may be able to create much more elaborate and detailed shapes and constructions than with an option such as composite wood. It's two times more expensive than pressure-treated wood, so make sure you have room in the budget if you want to go with this warm ...

Its recent survey of dealers nationwide found that eight in 10 figured their composite decking sales increased in 2012 by an average of 5%, and nine in 10 expect sales to increase by an average of 7% in 2013. ... “In the heyday of the home-building crunch, the [wood industry] was putting product out as fast as it could for as inexpensive as it could and gave pressure-treated a bit of an undeserved name,” says Michael Beaudry, president of the North American Deck and ...

composite decking vs Wood Decks, A composite decking review updated for 2018. ... All the big companies, , , Timber Tech and , and Wolf, (I am sure I missed a few) now produce decking with a hard plastic shell bonded to the composite board. ... The idea is for gaps to open up in the winter, and expand to tight in the summer without large gaps pushing open, fasteners breaking from pressure or bulges where the decking is expanding larger than the frame allows.

Expert advice on how to install and work with TREX and other composite decking materials, how to cut and fasten TREX, and framing for composite decking. ... important for two reasons. First, it allows for proper drainage and keeps the deck cleaner, safer, and less prone to moisture problems. Second, because composite ... When building your deck and railing, it is recommended that pressure treated wood be used as the framing and floor joists. This wood is protected ...

composite decking often goes down the same way as wood, that is, with stainless steel decking screws. But some manufacturers offer products with clip or tongue-and-groove assembly. These easy building systems result in deck surfaces without unsightly rows of visible screw heads. Cost. According to Popular Mechanics, basic pressure-treated lumber goes for about 80 cents per linear foot, while redwood or cedar runs up to three times that amount. composite decking materials, on ...

Replaced existing deck with new composite decking. Replaced ... REAL WOOD. Natural-wood decking products can be roughly divided into three categories: pressure-treated lumber, redwood and cedar, and tropical hardwoods. You'll find most types of wood decking at your local lumberyard, although availability may vary .... composite decking, such as , , and Veranda, is a hybrid product that's composed primarily of wood fibers and recycled plastic.

Even though there are additives in plastic decking they are not dangerous like those in pressure treated lumber. This makes this decking material quite safe to use where there are small children or pets. The additives are included under high pressure and heat. The surface of the plastic decking material is then brushed with a coating to give it the natural color of wood. Note: Vinyl decking is 100% plastic. But most of the decking plastic does contain some wood. All plastic deck material ...

Discover the benefits of both wood and composite decking options for your home. ... In terms of cleaning, pressure washing or a soft brush and detergent will rid the surface of most mildew, pollen and things the birds leave behind when they fly overhead. Mildew left for long periods of time might require a deeper cleaning technique, ... “Most of your decks are made of green wood, treated CPA wood; but that's a more cost effective way of doing the deck.” Southern Pine is one of the most ...

Although we recently got hit with over 2 feet of snow, believe it or not, spring is just around the corner and it is time to start thinking about your outdoor living spaces. There's no denying the appeal of great deck designs but, there's a choice to be made in what material to use in building that deck. The two most popular materials are pressure treated wood and (composite decking material). So, what exactly are these two materials? pressure treated wood undergoes ...

modern house with deck. A modern house in Carmel, California, with a wood deck. John Edward Linden/Getty Images. Wood or composite decking—or something else? Like any major home purchase, decking materials vary in looks, ... pressure-treated Wood. pressure treated wood. pressure-treated wood is identifiable by its slashes or holes. S. J. Pyrotechnic/Flickr/CC-2.0. Less durable woods, like Southern pine and Western fir, are treated with preservatives.

composite decking Won't Break the Bank. In 2013, Consumer Reports ran several articles and reviews comparing wood decking to alternative decking materials. They reported that pressure-treated pine is very popular and very inexpensive; but the wood tends to change color very quickly, and will rot, crack, and splinter over time. pressure-treated woods have the shortest deck life expectancy, and while the initial cost is relatively low, the long-term costs for repairs, ...

Most pressure treated flooring sold today is labeled as “mixed southern softwoods”-the pressure treated wood you may have used years ago was probably southern yellow pine BIG difference. Many of the new ... Definition: composite decking and rail is generally made of material such as plastics and very fine wood saw dust, which are mixed and compressed with intense pressure and heat. ... These new cap stock products have effectively cured the staining and mildew problems.

When Ron Kaplan took over as CEO of in January 2008, he knew the composite wood decking company was in a death spiral of quality problems, falling sales and widening losses. The previous year had lost $76 million on $329 million ... creating a composite that wouldn't rot or splinter. Today claims its decking will last 25 years without staining or fading, versus pressure-treated lumber, which requires yearly maintenance and lasts 7 years on average.

In an effort to help you determine which material is right for your boardwalk project, you'll find a detailed comparison of 's composite wood decking products and PermaTrak's concrete boardwalk system below. .... More durable than pressure-treated wood; Contractor familiarity, hire a deck builder tool via ; No heavy machinery required for most installations; Lower maintenance than pressure-treated wood decking, no splintering or splitting; Much improved ...

Dear Pablo: I am building a deck and am trying to decide between wood decking and a composite materials like . Which one is more environmentally friendly?A deck can be a great ... Wood is susceptible to dry rot, termites, splintering, and cracking. When a wood deck is demolished and removed the material can be reused, burned as firewood (unless it is pressure treated wood!), and composted in municipal composting facilities that chip it and turn it into soil.

In the end it just came down to personal factors about look, price, effort, keeping in line with our neighborhood, etc so we can definitely see why people come to different conclusions (and also develop some pretty strong opinions, if the message boards I've been reading are any indication). So we thought we'd run through our thought process for anyone else facing a similar decision. For us it quickly came down to two materials: pressure-treated wood vs. composite.

It doesn't require any finishing. Some plastic decking is made from new plastic; others are partially or completely recycled. composite: This decking is made from wood fibers (usually recycled maple sawdust) and recycled plastic. Dense, weather and stain resistant, it won't splinter, warp or rot. Wood: Most of today's wood decks are made of cedar, redwood (pictured), pressure-treated pine or ipe, a sustainable tropical wood. You can find sustainably produced versions ...