post for a 16x20 deck

10 - 60lb concrete mix for posts. 15 - 2x10 metal joist hangers. 20 lb 1 5 8 screws. 10 lb 16p nails. 24 - 3 1 2 lag bolts and washers. 1 - tube of silicon caulk. 1 - waterproof glue. All the lumber on this list is pressure treated. For a cedar or redwood deck the frame will still be pressure treated. Only the decking ...

Layout and Footing Locations. Starting with your perimeter, mark the location of each deck post to locate the fitting position. In general, posts should be spaced no more than 8 feet apart. Some builders position them every 4 feet for a completely rigid frame. The maximum distance between footings is determined by the size ...

The deck can be considered a floor structure. It has joists to support the flooring material (decking), and posts and beams to hold the unit up off the ground, slightly elevated or higher. Your deck design can be square, rectangular, multilevel or somewhat free-form. Plan and design the deck before buying any tools and ...

Our original plan was to build the one-level, step-up deck in between the four trees, but after trying to maneuver around the exposed roots, we learned our best solution was to shift the deck over and have the deck encompass one of our existing trees. This made our original straight forward square deck a little more ...

To avoid this we decided a floating deck would be the best option. We wanted to keep the design simple and clean, so with the help of our friends over at Kreg Tool Company, we used the deck jig and let the wood do all the talking. Note: The following post is by no means the only way to build a deck, ...

How many footings and posts will be needed to support the deck and where will they go? Footings and posts support the beams, which support the joists and the deck boards. The bigger the deck, the more footings you'll need. deck beam What size beams will be needed for the spans between posts? There are formulas to ...

How to Build a Deck Part 4 of 6 - Framing and Decking ... Does the local building code there allow for deck load to be placed solely on the shear force of screws and bolts through the support posts, why would even do that, use the proper brackets and place the beams on top of the posts? What a poor ...